Mizuno Run Academy: POSE Method

Last June 25, Monday was the start of Mizuno Run Academy in the Mizuno concept store at Bonifacio High Street. About 25 participants were present in the event as Coach Patrick Joson gave everyone an introduction of the running module: The Science of Running.

Mizuno starts its Run Academy in BHS

First day was all about POSE Method but before anything else we reviewed Newton’s 3 Laws of Motion: (1) Inertia; (2) Acceleration, and; (3) Action-Reaction. A simple picture to demonstrate them (see below image): imagine the marble not moving, now with the push of your finger it moves (Law of Inertia). Now it will continue to move unless an external force makes it to stop; in this case your finger again. Now, imagine the marble on top of the ramp. As you push with your finger, the speed of the marble increases (Law of Acceleration). Then again, acceleration will decrease if there’s a different direction of force acting on the marble that may decrease or increase the speed more. Lastly, what I mentioned on stopping or a different direction of force is called the reaction (Law of Action and Reaction) and thus completes my short explanation of Newton’s Laws of Motion.

Now what is the relationship with running? Remember gravity (yes, we are putting Science into it), we have what we call our General Center of Mass (GCM) and it is in our hips (no it’s not inside). To understand GCM, stand upright with your feet a foot apart, try to bend from your hips: lower, lower until one of your foot tries to step forward: we apply Newton’s Laws of Motion and Gravity! Now did you see yourself trying to stabilize as we go farther from our GCM (where we imagine a ball at the middle of our belly)?

It is also the same as in vertical jump exercise. From a stationary position, as you prep your way to jump, up in the air and going back; you are merely transferring your GCM and yes, still with gravity and Newton’s Laws of Motion. Again, what’s the relationship with running?

Exploring the GCM.

This is exactly the point of proper running, the POSE Method: POSE, FALL, PULL.

Running should be done naturally (all of the sciences behind it you can actually connect as you do the POSE exercise). As simple as the 45° principle where one of your foot goes back (your body almost forming a figure 4). From there you exchange your body mass forward, giving a force forward thus falling and on your next step will be naturally a change of support making your other foot pulls up naturally.

A quick check on POSE

Now, we tend to forget the form as we try to speed up and thus lessen the efficiency in running. We end up exhausted, inconsistent and worse, injured. The POSE method aims to have you running injury-free and running efficiently.

Also, to know that you are running in good form, the strain should only be at the calves and not at our extensor muscles (quad area). But the strain should only be gradual as the transfer of support is constant and gradual; else, we are exerting much effort making us susceptible to injury.

More readings on POSE Running in their website, click here.

Coach Patrick Joson demonstrates the POSE Method

The Mizuno Run Academy is an initiative of Jump Start Movement. Official hydration of the event is Gatorade, and thanks to Filinvest City and GNC as partners.

Photos courtesy online with keyword: POSE Method. Disclaimer: Ideas were taken from lecture in the Mizuno Run Academy as understood by the author and not in any way per verbatim by Coach Patrick Joson.

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2 Responses

  1. Very nice. Would love to share it but I’m afraid that this part (“Stand upright with your feet a foot apart, try to bend from your hips: lower, lower until one of your foot tries to step forward: we apply Newton’s Laws of Motion and Gravity! Now did you see yourself trying to stabilize as we go farther from our GCM (where we imagine a ball at the middle of our belly”) might confuse people and have them bended forward in the waist (K-position) which would naturally bring the buttock back (if staying in a balanced position). Or do I misunderstand you. I rather use the release of the hips forward (together with shoulders = “falling like a stick perception”) to allow the COM to pivot over support (which is the ball of the foot). See what I mean?
    Keep up the good!!

    Jacky Ledeboer

    • runningfree says:

      Hi Jacky,

      Thank you for the feedback! I just wanted to demonstrate how we try to balance our GCM so there really is a tendency to have a K-position because we wanted to stabilize ourselves. But this should not to be misunderstood on the running itself. :)

      Thanks again!
      Allan

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